CONTAINING LINKS TO 35725 STORIES FROM THE NETWORKS' NIGHTLY NEWSCASTS
     TYNDALL HEADLINE: HIGHLIGHTS FROM JANUARY 10, 2013
Influenza was Story of the Day again. NBC has now led with a hospital visit by its in-house physician for three straight days: Nancy Snyderman made a call to New York's Saint Barnabas Tuesday, Boston's Brigham & Women's Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia Thursday. Linsey Davis led ABC's newscast with the 'flu Wednesday and Thursday. CBS was the exception, kicking off with football: the autopsy of the NFL's suicidal star linebacker Junior Seau.    
     TYNDALL PICKS FOR JANUARY 10, 2013: CLICK ON GRID ELEMENTS TO SEARCH FOR MATCHING ITEMS
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video thumbnailABCGuns: firearms control regulations debateInfluential NRA meets with VP Biden's taskforceJonathan KarlWhite House
video thumbnailNBCObama Administration Cabinet reshuffle goes aheadBacklash against selection of senior white menAndrea MitchellWashington DC
video thumbnailABCPrescription drug sleeping pills safety warningsAmbien overprescribed, FDA recommends lower doseLisa StarkWashington DC
video thumbnailABCInfluenza seasonOutbreak overwhelms hospital emergency roomsLinsey DavisBoston
video thumbnailCBSReal estate housing market construction, sales, pricesConsumer protection rules on mortgages issuedMark StrassmannAtlanta
video thumbnailCBSSuperstorm Sandy is hurricane-nor'easter comboBeachfront businesses need rebuilt boardwalksElaine QuijanoNew Jersey
video thumbnailNBCOrca pod trapped in Hudson Bay ice off QuebecLured by unusual warm waters, then sudden freezeAnne ThompsonNew York
video thumbnailCBSSyria politics: rebellion designated as civil warSet up schools for traumatized refugee childrenClarissa WardNew York
video thumbnailABCNFL former star Junior Seau commits suicide, aged 43Autopsy finds CTE brain damage from violent playJim AvilaNew York
video thumbnailNBCAcademy Awards nominations announcedHonorees congratulated, some favorites snubbedKristen DahlgrenHollywood
 
TYNDALL BLOG: DAILY NOTES ON NETWORK TELEVISION NIGHTLY NEWS
YET MORE ‘FLU Influenza was Story of the Day again. NBC has now led with a hospital visit by its in-house physician for three straight days: Nancy Snyderman made a call to New York's Saint Barnabas Tuesday, Boston's Brigham & Women's Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia Thursday. Linsey Davis led ABC's newscast with the 'flu Wednesday and Thursday. CBS was the exception, kicking off with football: the autopsy of the NFL's suicidal star linebacker Junior Seau.


THURSDAY’S THOUGHTS Sports news that airs on the nightly newscasts often fails to find itself posted online. So Seth Doane's report on the playing-field-induced brain damage that changed Seau's personality, and may have ended his life at the age of 43, is nowhere to be found on cbsnews.com. Presumably, CBS News is being punctilious about the National Football League's copyrighted match video.

This is not a trivial matter. In effect, the NFL is shielding itself from the public relations disaster of having its workplace exposed as a crippling killer, at least by online video journalism. If ever the rationale applies of invoking fair use in order to post copyrighted footage, it applies here. Video of Junior Seau bashing his brains in is clearly protected.

By the way, ABC's Jim Avila also covered the Seau autopsy and his report is posted online. Oddly enough, it carries an Exclusive label, where clearly it is no such thing.

What failure do Andrea Mitchell's report on the white men filling senior posts in the Obama Cabinet and Anne Thompson's report on the white killer whales filling a hole in Hudson Bay ice have in common? No, it is not that they both use two-decades-old footage from Tom Brokaw's NBC Nightly News as illustrations (Mitchell actually quotes herself). Their flaw is that they both use clips from fictional stories as actuality footage in a news report. Using Mad Men and Big Miracle as items of journalism is as bad as Dan Quayle using Murphy Brown in political debate.

All three White House correspondents were assigned to cover the National Rifle Association's meeting with Vice President Joe Biden's taskforce on firearms regulation. None made an outright prediction, but judging by their tone, I would say that NBC' Kristen Welker and CBS' Major Garrett gave the advantage to gun control initiatives; ABC's Jonathan Karl was still certain of the Cold Dead Hands lobbying clout of the NRA. Compare and contrast.

Ambien is too strong, especially for women, and the FDA has recommended that smaller doses be prescribed. NBC's Tom Costello and CBS' in-house physician Jon LaPook both covered the sleeping pill. But Lisa Stark takes the cake on ABC, for having spotted the story early herself last August.

It is to be expected that ABC would decide to treat the Academy Awards nominations as newsworthy, since David Wright's report doubles as cross promotion for his network's coverage of the ceremonies themselves. NBC's Kristen Dahlgren found the better angle, though, in the Internet cafés of Kabul.

If you want a taste of the distinctive journalistic style of CBS' Evening News under the anchorship of Scott Pelley, you can go beyond story selection (although that was in evidence, again, as Mark Strassmann was the only correspondent assigned to the new rules on home mortgages, with the housing crisis being a CBS staple) and zero in on CBS' attraction to single, colorful, anecdotal individuals with a vivid soundbite to stand as proxies for an overall drama. Elaine Quijano meets Jimmy Kamaris.


HAT TIP TO THE DISH Media Matters' Jill Fitzsmmons (h/t Andrew Sullivan) posts research that counted only 12 stories on global warming on the three nightly newscasts in 2012. By contrast, Tyndall Report counted 17, although we do not argue with Fitzsimmons' central point, that global warming routinely goes unmentioned amid the heavy coverage of extreme weather events. For example, in the first week of Superstorm Sandy coverage, this lonely story by NBC's Richard Engel made a rare mention of rising sea levels.